Thisispaper Community
Join today.
Enter your email address to receive the latest news on emerging art, design, lifestyle and tech from Thisispaper, delivered straight to your inbox.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 11, 2021

Host to a small cafe and an open-air social area, Omoken Park has been designed by locally based Yabashi Architects to be a "public space of private space" where locals can gather and interact.

Yabashi Architects has built a simple, elongated and stepped cafe in a narrow site in Kyushu, Japan, as a new public intervention and social space. The 67,66-square-metre project was transformed from the ruins of buildings damaged by the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.

Dubbed as OMOKEN Park, the cafe, comprised of an elongated wooden volumes, has only two façades - one in street front and the other is the backyard. But this simple and modern box is entirely multi-purposed in which its roof are be able to be used as sitting and social area. Its stepped roof system also provides space in different levels while visitors observing what is happening inside the cafe.

"Citizens who have experienced earthquakes have become aware of symbiosis more than ever by helping each other," explained the practice, which is lead by Tohru Yabashi.

Inside is a small cafe that's almost entirely lined with cross-laminated timber (CLT), a warm contrast to the building's steel framework. Wood has also been used to create the long service counter, stool seats and central dining table, which is illuminated by exposed-bulb pendant lamps suspended overhead.

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 11, 2021

Host to a small cafe and an open-air social area, Omoken Park has been designed by locally based Yabashi Architects to be a "public space of private space" where locals can gather and interact.

Yabashi Architects has built a simple, elongated and stepped cafe in a narrow site in Kyushu, Japan, as a new public intervention and social space. The 67,66-square-metre project was transformed from the ruins of buildings damaged by the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake.

Dubbed as OMOKEN Park, the cafe, comprised of an elongated wooden volumes, has only two façades - one in street front and the other is the backyard. But this simple and modern box is entirely multi-purposed in which its roof are be able to be used as sitting and social area. Its stepped roof system also provides space in different levels while visitors observing what is happening inside the cafe.

"Citizens who have experienced earthquakes have become aware of symbiosis more than ever by helping each other," explained the practice, which is lead by Tohru Yabashi.

Inside is a small cafe that's almost entirely lined with cross-laminated timber (CLT), a warm contrast to the building's steel framework. Wood has also been used to create the long service counter, stool seats and central dining table, which is illuminated by exposed-bulb pendant lamps suspended overhead.

Architecture
section is proudly under the patronage of:
John Pawson

Independent publications like Thisispaper rely on support by readers and companies to be sustainable.

Current patron of Architecture Section:

If you are ready to book a slot, please use the following link:
Become a Patron

Introducing OS
An intimate space which helps creative minds thrive.
Discover. Share. Embrace.
Visit New Thisispaper Shop
ThisispaperOSGuides
Discover the most inspiring places and stories through carefully-curated guides and editions you'll love.
Explore all GuidesExplore channels