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@zaxarovcom
Feb 17, 2023

The Bus Stop in Shodoshima, Japan, designed by Tato Architects is a stunning architectural marvel that showcases the power of design to elevate even the most mundane of spaces.

Positioned at the foot of the Bodhisattva Kannon, the sloping site provided a unique challenge for the architects. They overcame this challenge by creating a series of linked discs on a horizontal plane that appears to float above the ground. These discs, made of 6mm-thick steel plates with eco-friendly thermal insulation coating, offer a variety of functions for the people waiting for the bus - benches, tables, and shade from the sun.

There are approximately 90 linked discs that are supported by 48 columns, with each disc calibrated to the angle of the sloping ground, evoking the image of lily pads on a lotus pond. The columns, made of circular steel rods that are 30mm in diameter, are bundled into groups of three and anchored by reinforced concrete bases that are 800mm in diameter. This design introduces a series of curving lines on a single plane that resembles the gold clouds used in traditional Japanese room partition paintings, making it an ideal complement to the landscape.

The Bus Stop in Shodoshima is a perfect example of how good design can enhance the public experience. The architects have taken an ordinary space and transformed it into a functional and beautiful work of art.

In conclusion, the Bus Stop in Shodoshima is an architectural masterpiece that demonstrates the power of design to transform even the most ordinary of spaces into something extraordinary. Its unique design, use of eco-friendly materials, and practical functionality make it an ideal model for future public infrastructure projects.

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@zaxarovcom
Feb 17, 2023

The Bus Stop in Shodoshima, Japan, designed by Tato Architects is a stunning architectural marvel that showcases the power of design to elevate even the most mundane of spaces.

Positioned at the foot of the Bodhisattva Kannon, the sloping site provided a unique challenge for the architects. They overcame this challenge by creating a series of linked discs on a horizontal plane that appears to float above the ground. These discs, made of 6mm-thick steel plates with eco-friendly thermal insulation coating, offer a variety of functions for the people waiting for the bus - benches, tables, and shade from the sun.

There are approximately 90 linked discs that are supported by 48 columns, with each disc calibrated to the angle of the sloping ground, evoking the image of lily pads on a lotus pond. The columns, made of circular steel rods that are 30mm in diameter, are bundled into groups of three and anchored by reinforced concrete bases that are 800mm in diameter. This design introduces a series of curving lines on a single plane that resembles the gold clouds used in traditional Japanese room partition paintings, making it an ideal complement to the landscape.

The Bus Stop in Shodoshima is a perfect example of how good design can enhance the public experience. The architects have taken an ordinary space and transformed it into a functional and beautiful work of art.

In conclusion, the Bus Stop in Shodoshima is an architectural masterpiece that demonstrates the power of design to transform even the most ordinary of spaces into something extraordinary. Its unique design, use of eco-friendly materials, and practical functionality make it an ideal model for future public infrastructure projects.

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