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Architecture
Nov
18
Watch/Watertower Sint Jansklooster by Zecc Architecten
Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 18, 2020

Located amongst the marshes of De Wieden, a national park in the Dutch Province of Overijssel, the decommissioned water tower transformed by Zecc Architecten provides a monumental landmark on the skyline.

The architect responded by installing wooden staircases that allow visitors to climb up to a viewing platform 45 metres above the ground, offering 360-degree views of the surrounding wetlands. On the one hand, wood adds a warm element that contrasts with the stark concrete walls of the tower. On the other hand, it is a gesture to Nature Monuments by using a raw and unpolished natural material. By adding the new route complementary to the old existing one, spatial interaction is created.

Where the old stairs led up alongside the walls, the new stairs zigzag across the tower to reinforce the spatial perception. Alongside the four small existing windows, four large ones have been added that complete the view of De Wieden. The public makes an exciting and multifaceted journey upstairs and is rewarded with a beautiful view.

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Alexander Zaxarov
November 18, 2020

Located amongst the marshes of De Wieden, a national park in the Dutch Province of Overijssel, the decommissioned water tower transformed by Zecc Architecten provides a monumental landmark on the skyline.

The architect responded by installing wooden staircases that allow visitors to climb up to a viewing platform 45 metres above the ground, offering 360-degree views of the surrounding wetlands. On the one hand, wood adds a warm element that contrasts with the stark concrete walls of the tower. On the other hand, it is a gesture to Nature Monuments by using a raw and unpolished natural material. By adding the new route complementary to the old existing one, spatial interaction is created.

Where the old stairs led up alongside the walls, the new stairs zigzag across the tower to reinforce the spatial perception. Alongside the four small existing windows, four large ones have been added that complete the view of De Wieden. The public makes an exciting and multifaceted journey upstairs and is rewarded with a beautiful view.

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