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Architecture
Oct
23
The Wilderness Tower by Marcus Jefferies
Edition
Off-the-Grid
under the patronage of
Nature
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Oct 23, 2020

Inhabiting the flat landscape of the Somerset levels in England is a contemporary folly designed by artist Marcus Jefferies.

The sculpture is located at Glastonbury Heath marshes, renowned for its peat production and spectacular wildlife habitat. Close by is an RSPB reserve which is home to an abundance of rare and indigenous birds. The structure draws inspiration from the surrounding agricultural architecture, such as water towers and bird hides, and maintains a strong connection to the surrounding environment.

In addition to referencing the local vernacular, Marcus Jefferies wanted to include his interest in geometric design and its connection to nature and landscape. The structure employs a staggered and repeated decagonal shape commonly found in natural forms such as flower petals and the patterns of cracks in the earth.

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
October 23, 2020

Inhabiting the flat landscape of the Somerset levels in England is a contemporary folly designed by artist Marcus Jefferies.

The sculpture is located at Glastonbury Heath marshes, renowned for its peat production and spectacular wildlife habitat. Close by is an RSPB reserve which is home to an abundance of rare and indigenous birds. The structure draws inspiration from the surrounding agricultural architecture, such as water towers and bird hides, and maintains a strong connection to the surrounding environment.

In addition to referencing the local vernacular, Marcus Jefferies wanted to include his interest in geometric design and its connection to nature and landscape. The structure employs a staggered and repeated decagonal shape commonly found in natural forms such as flower petals and the patterns of cracks in the earth.

No items found.
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