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Tokyo Bud House by Yoshinori Sakano Architects
Edition
Jutaku
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Dec 8, 2020

With a minimal footprint of just 26 sqm, this tiny Tokyo house by Yoshinori Sakano Architects is divided into seven split levels without partitions.

From the shop on the ground floor, a metal staircase links to the kitchen and dining, then living and finally a sleeping space at the top shared by all the family members. A second set of concrete steps continue from the ground floor to the basement, housing the bathroom and store.
The space on each split level is small - barely enough to put the most essential of furniture, but they feel sufficiently roomy. Each space is isolated as a different level and connects to one another, hence the residents live in many different small spaces as well as one large spaces.

Almost all interior surfaces are made of larch plywood. Each panel is cut into a parallelogram and laid out in a herringbone pattern. This pattern is repeated on the ivory façade with galvarium steel sheets. The pattern consistency applied to both the exterior and interior evokes a more three-dimensional experience.

With each space being so small, having no walls proves advantageous – the residents can move quickly from one space to another. This constant activity could be compared to “mutters of Twitter” where short messages are sent out through the internet. Each space is very small, but acts in these small spaces are varied and these small various acts connect with one another.

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Alexander Zaxarov
December 8, 2020

With a minimal footprint of just 26 sqm, this tiny Tokyo house by Yoshinori Sakano Architects is divided into seven split levels without partitions.

From the shop on the ground floor, a metal staircase links to the kitchen and dining, then living and finally a sleeping space at the top shared by all the family members. A second set of concrete steps continue from the ground floor to the basement, housing the bathroom and store.
The space on each split level is small - barely enough to put the most essential of furniture, but they feel sufficiently roomy. Each space is isolated as a different level and connects to one another, hence the residents live in many different small spaces as well as one large spaces.

Almost all interior surfaces are made of larch plywood. Each panel is cut into a parallelogram and laid out in a herringbone pattern. This pattern is repeated on the ivory façade with galvarium steel sheets. The pattern consistency applied to both the exterior and interior evokes a more three-dimensional experience.

With each space being so small, having no walls proves advantageous – the residents can move quickly from one space to another. This constant activity could be compared to “mutters of Twitter” where short messages are sent out through the internet. Each space is very small, but acts in these small spaces are varied and these small various acts connect with one another.

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