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SunnyHills at Minami-Aoyama by Kengo Kuma & Associates
Hitoshi Arato
Nov 17, 2021

Employing a joint system called ‘Jiigoku-gumi’ used in traditional Japanese wooden architecture, Kengo Kuma have wrapped ‘Sunny Hills’–a dessert shop specializing in selling pineapple cake–with a systematic construction that is reminiscent of a bamboo basket.

The building technique is often applied in the making of ‘Shoji’–crosspieces of wood arranged in a lattice formation–in which Kengo Kuma has positioned the material to form a muntin grid across the façade of the 297 m2 space. Generally, two pieces intersect in two-dimensions, but in enveloping the structure, the Japanese architect has combined the 60mm x 60mm components in three dimensions, angled 30 degrees from one another. the openings between the wood allow sunlight to naturally illuminate the interior, while still offering privacy.

As the building is situated in Omotesando a residential area of Aoyama in Tokyo, KKAA wanted to create a soft, natural atmosphere in order that it sits will among the houses, while still standing apart from the concrete box homes around it. visually and socially interesting amongst the community, the result is a warm addition to the neighbourhood.

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Hitoshi Arato
Nov 17, 2021

Employing a joint system called ‘Jiigoku-gumi’ used in traditional Japanese wooden architecture, Kengo Kuma have wrapped ‘Sunny Hills’–a dessert shop specializing in selling pineapple cake–with a systematic construction that is reminiscent of a bamboo basket.

The building technique is often applied in the making of ‘Shoji’–crosspieces of wood arranged in a lattice formation–in which Kengo Kuma has positioned the material to form a muntin grid across the façade of the 297 m2 space. Generally, two pieces intersect in two-dimensions, but in enveloping the structure, the Japanese architect has combined the 60mm x 60mm components in three dimensions, angled 30 degrees from one another. the openings between the wood allow sunlight to naturally illuminate the interior, while still offering privacy.

As the building is situated in Omotesando a residential area of Aoyama in Tokyo, KKAA wanted to create a soft, natural atmosphere in order that it sits will among the houses, while still standing apart from the concrete box homes around it. visually and socially interesting amongst the community, the result is a warm addition to the neighbourhood.

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