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@zaxarovcom
Sep 29, 2022

MoyaMoya House designed by Tokyo-based Fumihiko Sano Studio is enveloped by layers of fine stainless steel mesh making it look like it is wrapped in gauzy fabric.

Constructed around a large double-height studio, it was built for a female client who needed space for her hobby of dyeing kimonos.

Two layers of perforated and flexible material are wrapped around the existing building to create a moiré effect that gives an illusion of movement while protecting the interior form outside views. The reflections ripple across the surface as the wind blows and blur the appearance of the building behind it. Not only does it change depending on the weather, the changing light condition during the day and the seasons also change the appearance of the mesh box.

The entrance is positioned facing a small parking area and leads into a double-height central room, featuring a large sink and storage space that the owner uses for kimono dyeing. Sliding doors connect the kitchen and the study, which leads to the main bedroom. The upper storey featuring white banisters and open threads is accessed via a discreet staircase. Spare bedrooms and a small bathroom are located on the first floor and are meant to accommodate foreign students that will move in once the owner’s children leave home.

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@zaxarovcom
Sep 29, 2022

MoyaMoya House designed by Tokyo-based Fumihiko Sano Studio is enveloped by layers of fine stainless steel mesh making it look like it is wrapped in gauzy fabric.

Constructed around a large double-height studio, it was built for a female client who needed space for her hobby of dyeing kimonos.

Two layers of perforated and flexible material are wrapped around the existing building to create a moiré effect that gives an illusion of movement while protecting the interior form outside views. The reflections ripple across the surface as the wind blows and blur the appearance of the building behind it. Not only does it change depending on the weather, the changing light condition during the day and the seasons also change the appearance of the mesh box.

The entrance is positioned facing a small parking area and leads into a double-height central room, featuring a large sink and storage space that the owner uses for kimono dyeing. Sliding doors connect the kitchen and the study, which leads to the main bedroom. The upper storey featuring white banisters and open threads is accessed via a discreet staircase. Spare bedrooms and a small bathroom are located on the first floor and are meant to accommodate foreign students that will move in once the owner’s children leave home.

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