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Architecture
Nov
11
Merida House by Ludwig Godefroy Architecture
Edition
DwellWell
under the patronage of
Concrete Stories
under the patronage of
Villa
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 11, 2020

Architect Ludwig Godefroy has designed this fragmented concrete house, which spans an 80-metre-long site in Mérida, Mexico, to draw on Mayan traditions and culture.

Casa Mérida is located in the largest Yucatán state which experiences extreme climates. The consistently high temperatures have resulted in a heavy reliance on air-conditioning and it is very common for modern houses to run it all day. The house is described as a garden interspersed by rising concrete volumes, which ensure the home benefits from open, light and naturally ventilated interiors. The backyard is moved to the front and the kitchen, living room and swimming pool is inverted towards the rear. The layout of the home is structured along a concrete wall that runs the entire length of the site. Off it hang separate bedroom and living shelters as well as the outdoor patios. Instead of enclosing people, the house is open and breathes while still providing the essential feeling of protection and privacy.

Casa Mérida’s rustic aesthetic is characterized by minimal design features that’s made to age with a unique patina, like a stone bathtub, monolithic concrete steps, big wooden windows and doors, complemented by rich blue textiles that mirror the house’s swimming pool.

‘Casa Mérida is not a house with a garden. It is a garden with a house’.

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Alexander Zaxarov
November 11, 2020

Architect Ludwig Godefroy has designed this fragmented concrete house, which spans an 80-metre-long site in Mérida, Mexico, to draw on Mayan traditions and culture.

Casa Mérida is located in the largest Yucatán state which experiences extreme climates. The consistently high temperatures have resulted in a heavy reliance on air-conditioning and it is very common for modern houses to run it all day. The house is described as a garden interspersed by rising concrete volumes, which ensure the home benefits from open, light and naturally ventilated interiors. The backyard is moved to the front and the kitchen, living room and swimming pool is inverted towards the rear. The layout of the home is structured along a concrete wall that runs the entire length of the site. Off it hang separate bedroom and living shelters as well as the outdoor patios. Instead of enclosing people, the house is open and breathes while still providing the essential feeling of protection and privacy.

Casa Mérida’s rustic aesthetic is characterized by minimal design features that’s made to age with a unique patina, like a stone bathtub, monolithic concrete steps, big wooden windows and doors, complemented by rich blue textiles that mirror the house’s swimming pool.

‘Casa Mérida is not a house with a garden. It is a garden with a house’.

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