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Hitoshi Arato
Oct 14, 2021

Loba house, designed by Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, consists of a monolithic concrete block heavily anchored to the edge of a cliff.

As a result of its under dimensioned thickness, its narrow and tall proportions, the building could be regarded as an inhabited wall that runs perpendicular to the terrain. A continuous horizon and a stepped sequence of six platforms that descend to the sea determine the height of this wall.

Three massive columns and two bridges interrupt the separation between that horizontal roof (functioning as a terrace) and the regular extension of the ground (containing the informal arrangement of dining and living space), a single asymmetrical room. While beds are placed in the upper platforms, with low ceilings, sofas or tables are meant to be on the lower platforms, within a vertical space.

On either side of the long volume, there are discreet openings with some punctual skylights, a couple of half-moon perforations that could be used as sun clocks, and a single corner window separated by a round pillar. In this window, the outer concrete surface is flush with the unframed glass. The reflection of the sunset is mirrored by an almost impossible and illusory floating rock.

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Hitoshi Arato
Oct 14, 2021

Loba house, designed by Pezo von Ellrichshausen Architects, consists of a monolithic concrete block heavily anchored to the edge of a cliff.

As a result of its under dimensioned thickness, its narrow and tall proportions, the building could be regarded as an inhabited wall that runs perpendicular to the terrain. A continuous horizon and a stepped sequence of six platforms that descend to the sea determine the height of this wall.

Three massive columns and two bridges interrupt the separation between that horizontal roof (functioning as a terrace) and the regular extension of the ground (containing the informal arrangement of dining and living space), a single asymmetrical room. While beds are placed in the upper platforms, with low ceilings, sofas or tables are meant to be on the lower platforms, within a vertical space.

On either side of the long volume, there are discreet openings with some punctual skylights, a couple of half-moon perforations that could be used as sun clocks, and a single corner window separated by a round pillar. In this window, the outer concrete surface is flush with the unframed glass. The reflection of the sunset is mirrored by an almost impossible and illusory floating rock.

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