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@zaxarovcom
Jan 25, 2023

The House in Imbe, designed by Tamotsu Teshima Architects, is a striking blend of form and function.

The house serves as both a studio and residence for a ceramic artist, and the design reflects the idea that the artist's creative work should seamlessly blend into their everyday life. The use of different materials on the first and upper floors, concrete and wood respectively, adds a unique layer of depth and interest to the design.

The simple plan of the house, with the boundaries between rooms defined loosely through lines inlaid in the flooring, allows for a sense of flow and continuity throughout the spaces. The use of natural light is also noteworthy, with corridors on the periphery of the structure filling the interior with light, and wooden reflectors in the skylights adding to the overall ambiance. The use of rustic materials like plaster and oak on the upper floors adds warmth and coziness to the living spaces.

The use of charred cedar cladding on the exterior of the building is a particularly interesting touch, as it draws from the traditional building material of the Setouchi region in Okayama and helps the building blend seamlessly into its surroundings. The house in Imbe is a prime example of how architecture can be used to create a harmonious balance between function and inspiration, and how a building can be designed to enhance the daily lives of its inhabitants.

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@zaxarovcom
Jan 25, 2023

The House in Imbe, designed by Tamotsu Teshima Architects, is a striking blend of form and function.

The house serves as both a studio and residence for a ceramic artist, and the design reflects the idea that the artist's creative work should seamlessly blend into their everyday life. The use of different materials on the first and upper floors, concrete and wood respectively, adds a unique layer of depth and interest to the design.

The simple plan of the house, with the boundaries between rooms defined loosely through lines inlaid in the flooring, allows for a sense of flow and continuity throughout the spaces. The use of natural light is also noteworthy, with corridors on the periphery of the structure filling the interior with light, and wooden reflectors in the skylights adding to the overall ambiance. The use of rustic materials like plaster and oak on the upper floors adds warmth and coziness to the living spaces.

The use of charred cedar cladding on the exterior of the building is a particularly interesting touch, as it draws from the traditional building material of the Setouchi region in Okayama and helps the building blend seamlessly into its surroundings. The house in Imbe is a prime example of how architecture can be used to create a harmonious balance between function and inspiration, and how a building can be designed to enhance the daily lives of its inhabitants.

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