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Yomogidai House by Tomoaki Uno Architects
@zaxarovcom
Apr 10, 2020

Tomoaki Uno Architects has completed the Yomogidai House, a wooden dwelling located in a quite residential area about 20 minutes east of the city of Nagoya in Japan.

It took about a year for the site to meet the client’s requirements. The site was a gentle slope with a frontage of 8m and a depth of 28m. The architects decided to make it elaborate and elegant from the impression of the client. In the end, they took the hint of the Japanese architectural shrine and proceeded with the plan. It was very difficult to incorporate all the elements into thin pillars and beams and deliver them rationally.

"The choice of materials and finishes was made of natural materials as much as possible, and I aimed for healing architecture in all aspects," said the studio's founder, Tomoaki Uno.

"I believe in the beauty of the ordinary things," he continued. "The most interesting is lurking in the most uninteresting. This architecture was made that way. I tried to fill the maximum function with minimal material."

No items found.
No items found.
@zaxarovcom
Apr 10, 2020

Tomoaki Uno Architects has completed the Yomogidai House, a wooden dwelling located in a quite residential area about 20 minutes east of the city of Nagoya in Japan.

It took about a year for the site to meet the client’s requirements. The site was a gentle slope with a frontage of 8m and a depth of 28m. The architects decided to make it elaborate and elegant from the impression of the client. In the end, they took the hint of the Japanese architectural shrine and proceeded with the plan. It was very difficult to incorporate all the elements into thin pillars and beams and deliver them rationally.

"The choice of materials and finishes was made of natural materials as much as possible, and I aimed for healing architecture in all aspects," said the studio's founder, Tomoaki Uno.

"I believe in the beauty of the ordinary things," he continued. "The most interesting is lurking in the most uninteresting. This architecture was made that way. I tried to fill the maximum function with minimal material."

No items found.
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