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Alexander Zaxarov
Oct 25, 2021

In his project Wild Goose Chase, Marinos Tsagkarakis leaves rationality behind to be fascinated by the absurd.

Marinos is a Greek photographer who creates conceptual projects that reflect the current situation in his home country and his personal concerns.

"Under what criteria can we define absurdity? Is “common sense” the perfect reference for recognising the meaningful, and the rational.

I grew up under the common western norms of what is reasonable. Actually, I followed all the “right” steps that lead safely to a successful and happy life. Looking back, the last time I felt excited and genuinely happy about something was during my childhood; with my vivid imagination, I was constantly experimenting, tasting, feeling the world around me…

This amazing feeling came back in my adult life only when I started being interested in the absurd; chasing objects, and life scenes that make no practical sense; events and facts that you doubt about their existence. In a world full of rationalism and ubiquitous political correctness, these small spikes of confusion may be the key for subverting the absurd into something substantial, and fascinating." — Marinos Tsagkarakis

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Alexander Zaxarov
Oct 25, 2021

In his project Wild Goose Chase, Marinos Tsagkarakis leaves rationality behind to be fascinated by the absurd.

Marinos is a Greek photographer who creates conceptual projects that reflect the current situation in his home country and his personal concerns.

"Under what criteria can we define absurdity? Is “common sense” the perfect reference for recognising the meaningful, and the rational.

I grew up under the common western norms of what is reasonable. Actually, I followed all the “right” steps that lead safely to a successful and happy life. Looking back, the last time I felt excited and genuinely happy about something was during my childhood; with my vivid imagination, I was constantly experimenting, tasting, feeling the world around me…

This amazing feeling came back in my adult life only when I started being interested in the absurd; chasing objects, and life scenes that make no practical sense; events and facts that you doubt about their existence. In a world full of rationalism and ubiquitous political correctness, these small spikes of confusion may be the key for subverting the absurd into something substantial, and fascinating." — Marinos Tsagkarakis

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