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The Man Machine by Vincent Fournier
Edition
Future
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Dec 10, 2020

Vincent Fournier’s “The Man Machine” is a whimsical look into a world where humans and robots coexist.

French artist/photographer Vincent Fournier‘s ongoing series plays into a source of existential angst for basically every human in 2019: man’s relationship with robots. By staging several humanoid robots in realistic reconstructions of day-to-day domestic scenes, ‘The Man Machine’ project reflects on how artificial creatures such as robots or other avatars can evolve in our day-to-day life.

“My aim was to create a balance between the spectator and the robot, between a process of identification and distance. We find this idea in the ‘the Uncanny Valley’ – a scientific theory elaborated by the Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori which states that the more a robot resembles a human being, the more its imperfections seem monstrous to us. The current development of these artificial creatures in our society brings fascination but also the frightening issue of the social acceptance of these changes,” Fournier explains.

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Alexander Zaxarov
December 10, 2020

Vincent Fournier’s “The Man Machine” is a whimsical look into a world where humans and robots coexist.

French artist/photographer Vincent Fournier‘s ongoing series plays into a source of existential angst for basically every human in 2019: man’s relationship with robots. By staging several humanoid robots in realistic reconstructions of day-to-day domestic scenes, ‘The Man Machine’ project reflects on how artificial creatures such as robots or other avatars can evolve in our day-to-day life.

“My aim was to create a balance between the spectator and the robot, between a process of identification and distance. We find this idea in the ‘the Uncanny Valley’ – a scientific theory elaborated by the Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori which states that the more a robot resembles a human being, the more its imperfections seem monstrous to us. The current development of these artificial creatures in our society brings fascination but also the frightening issue of the social acceptance of these changes,” Fournier explains.

section is proudly under the patronage of:
Unseen

Voluptates quasi quo aperiam.

Ut rerum non in est. Facere delectus maxime.
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