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@zaxarovcom
May 24, 2024

In the serene setting of Wondelgem, Belgium, Atelier Janda Vanderghote's latest project, T(UIN)HUIS, emerges as an epitome of seamless integration between architecture and nature.

Originally envisioned as a woodworking studio, this compact structure temporarily serves as a dwelling amidst ongoing construction elsewhere on the plot. The design's inherent flexibility, with an open plan that encourages adaptive use, points to a future rich with possibilities, whether as a creative workspace, a guest house, or a serene retreat.

The architectural integrity of T(UIN)HUIS lies in its clear and straightforward structural layering. The primary concrete framework, extending like the organic branches of a tree, offers robust support while fostering a connection with the surrounding greenery. This skeletal concrete form is complemented by a wooden framework, harmoniously blending with the lush canopy of the park.

The use of large windows is particularly noteworthy. These expansive panes not only frame picturesque views of the garden and park beyond but also invite an abundance of natural light, enhancing the sense of spaciousness within. The result is a tranquil interior environment that feels both expansive and intimately connected to the outdoors.

Atelier Janda Vanderghote's choice of materials further reinforces the project's ethos of simplicity and honesty. The use of robust, unpretentious materials imbues the space with a sense of calm and durability, reflecting a design philosophy that values substance over superficiality.

In reorganizing the original garden of grass and fir trees, the designers have created a green extension of the park, enhancing the permeability of the plot. This deliberate landscaping effort not only blurs the boundaries between garden and park but also promises an even greener future, where the built environment and natural world coexist in harmonious balance.

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@zaxarovcom
May 24, 2024

In the serene setting of Wondelgem, Belgium, Atelier Janda Vanderghote's latest project, T(UIN)HUIS, emerges as an epitome of seamless integration between architecture and nature.

Originally envisioned as a woodworking studio, this compact structure temporarily serves as a dwelling amidst ongoing construction elsewhere on the plot. The design's inherent flexibility, with an open plan that encourages adaptive use, points to a future rich with possibilities, whether as a creative workspace, a guest house, or a serene retreat.

The architectural integrity of T(UIN)HUIS lies in its clear and straightforward structural layering. The primary concrete framework, extending like the organic branches of a tree, offers robust support while fostering a connection with the surrounding greenery. This skeletal concrete form is complemented by a wooden framework, harmoniously blending with the lush canopy of the park.

The use of large windows is particularly noteworthy. These expansive panes not only frame picturesque views of the garden and park beyond but also invite an abundance of natural light, enhancing the sense of spaciousness within. The result is a tranquil interior environment that feels both expansive and intimately connected to the outdoors.

Atelier Janda Vanderghote's choice of materials further reinforces the project's ethos of simplicity and honesty. The use of robust, unpretentious materials imbues the space with a sense of calm and durability, reflecting a design philosophy that values substance over superficiality.

In reorganizing the original garden of grass and fir trees, the designers have created a green extension of the park, enhancing the permeability of the plot. This deliberate landscaping effort not only blurs the boundaries between garden and park but also promises an even greener future, where the built environment and natural world coexist in harmonious balance.

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