Thisispaper Community
Join today.
Enter your email address to receive the latest news on emerging art, design, lifestyle and tech from Thisispaper, delivered straight to your inbox.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Zuzanna Gasior
Jun 9, 2021

Georg Gerster, best known for his extended work in documenting nature from above, became the pioneer in aerial photography.

Born in Winterthur near Zurich in 1928, Georg Gerster studied languages before serving as the science editor of the Weltwoche news magazine from 1950 to 1956. After that he became a freelance journalist with a focus on science reporting and aerial photography. Gerster took his first photo flight in Sudan in 1963. 

His work took him as far as Antarctica and appeared in National Geographic as well as in Swissair posters. Gerster used the alienation effect inherent in aerial photographs to inspire respect for the beauty of the planet and an understanding of the old structures and life forms that have evolved over the centuries. He aimed to document the impact of human intervention on the ecosystem. 

‘I see my best aerial photographs as a kick-start for flights of thought. The aerial picture is a tool of reflection. From high up, one sees not only what is, but just as well what could be – the inventory of our possibilities.’ words by Georg Gerster.

No items found.
No items found.
Zuzanna Gasior
June 9, 2021

Georg Gerster, best known for his extended work in documenting nature from above, became the pioneer in aerial photography.

Born in Winterthur near Zurich in 1928, Georg Gerster studied languages before serving as the science editor of the Weltwoche news magazine from 1950 to 1956. After that he became a freelance journalist with a focus on science reporting and aerial photography. Gerster took his first photo flight in Sudan in 1963. 

His work took him as far as Antarctica and appeared in National Geographic as well as in Swissair posters. Gerster used the alienation effect inherent in aerial photographs to inspire respect for the beauty of the planet and an understanding of the old structures and life forms that have evolved over the centuries. He aimed to document the impact of human intervention on the ecosystem. 

‘I see my best aerial photographs as a kick-start for flights of thought. The aerial picture is a tool of reflection. From high up, one sees not only what is, but just as well what could be – the inventory of our possibilities.’ words by Georg Gerster.

section is proudly under the patronage of:
Unseen

Voluptates quasi quo aperiam.

Ut rerum non in est. Facere delectus maxime.
Introducing OS
An intimate space which helps creative minds thrive.
Discover. Share. Embrace.
Why? "Because in an era of high-tech and climate extremes, we are drowning in information while starving for wisdom."
Subscribe now €10 monthly
Visit Thisispaper Shop
ThisispaperOSEditions
Discover the most inspiring stories and places through carefully-curated guides and editions you'll love.
Explore all EditionsExplore channels