Join Early Access
Be the first to know about our new curated channels and new platform functionalities updates.

Enter your email address to be added to the list. We'll email you very soon.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Become a Member
Join Free
Log in to your account
Log in
By creating an account, you agree Term & Conditions and accept our Policy.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Don't have an account? Register now.
Nara Centennial Hall by Arata Isozaki
Alexander Zaxarov
Feb 24, 2020

Arata Isozaki, a city planner, architect, and theorist, is the winner of 2019 Pritzker Prize, the annual award regarded as the Nobel Prize for architecture.

Arata Isozaki spent much of his childhood in the shadow of World War II. As a native of the city of Oita, the Japanese architect grew up just across a slim body of water from Hiroshima, where the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb — and he says he saw firsthand the ease with which proud human achievements could be leveled.

"It was in complete ruins, and there was no architecture, no buildings and not even a city. Only barracks and shelters surrounded me," Isozaki, now 87, recalls in a recorded statement. "So, my first experience of architecture was the void of architecture, and I began to consider how people might rebuild their homes and cities."

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
February 24, 2020

Arata Isozaki, a city planner, architect, and theorist, is the winner of 2019 Pritzker Prize, the annual award regarded as the Nobel Prize for architecture.

Arata Isozaki spent much of his childhood in the shadow of World War II. As a native of the city of Oita, the Japanese architect grew up just across a slim body of water from Hiroshima, where the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb — and he says he saw firsthand the ease with which proud human achievements could be leveled.

"It was in complete ruins, and there was no architecture, no buildings and not even a city. Only barracks and shelters surrounded me," Isozaki, now 87, recalls in a recorded statement. "So, my first experience of architecture was the void of architecture, and I began to consider how people might rebuild their homes and cities."

Architecture
section is proudly under the patronage of:
John Pawson

Independent publications like Thisispaper rely on support by readers and companies to be sustainable.

Current patron of Architecture Section:

If you are ready to book a slot, please use the following link:
Become a Patron

Introducing Channels
Feed your curiosity and make better sense of the world through carefully-curated channels that matter to you.
Discover the most inspiring stories, people and ideas through channels you love.
Get Early AccessExplore channels
Daily human-curation.
Weekly roundups.

Worlds-class sources.

Meaningful ideas.
No ads, no personal data.
Coronavirus
DwellWell
climax logo thisispaper
DwellWell
Lifespan
>nocode<
+ 3 more
Thisispaper Shop
Honest.
Handmade.
Future.
Visit Shop