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Maana Kamo by Shigenori
Edition
Japan
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Dec 9, 2020

Located in the historic Higashiyama District in Kyoto, Japan, the hotel was designed by Shigenori for Maana Homes, the owner of a collection of luxury retreats hidden within some of the Japanese city's old streets.

Historic clay walls and 100-year-old wooden beams form the backdrop to this peaceful Kyoto rental’s interiors, whose moody interiors play with shadow and light.

Japanese architect Uoya Shigenori oversaw the machiya’s transformation, removing peeling vinyl and ceiling tiles to reveal the historic elements beneath. He’s left these weathered materials to shine through, pairing them with traditional Japanese pieces, including tatami mats, lacquered kitchen surfaces, and paper-covered sliding screen doors.

"Preserving and highlighting the house's imperfectly aged beauty is the backbone of our design philosophy," said Maana Homes.

Ornament is kept to a minimum throughout, while storage spaces for the hotel staff are disguised within the walls. The lack of ornament is to ensure Maana Kamo guesthouse is "visually quiet" and free from distraction, providing occupants with space to slow down and reflect.

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Alexander Zaxarov
December 9, 2020

Located in the historic Higashiyama District in Kyoto, Japan, the hotel was designed by Shigenori for Maana Homes, the owner of a collection of luxury retreats hidden within some of the Japanese city's old streets.

Historic clay walls and 100-year-old wooden beams form the backdrop to this peaceful Kyoto rental’s interiors, whose moody interiors play with shadow and light.

Japanese architect Uoya Shigenori oversaw the machiya’s transformation, removing peeling vinyl and ceiling tiles to reveal the historic elements beneath. He’s left these weathered materials to shine through, pairing them with traditional Japanese pieces, including tatami mats, lacquered kitchen surfaces, and paper-covered sliding screen doors.

"Preserving and highlighting the house's imperfectly aged beauty is the backbone of our design philosophy," said Maana Homes.

Ornament is kept to a minimum throughout, while storage spaces for the hotel staff are disguised within the walls. The lack of ornament is to ensure Maana Kamo guesthouse is "visually quiet" and free from distraction, providing occupants with space to slow down and reflect.

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