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Architecture
Aug
27
House N by Sou Fujimoto Architects
Edition
Jutaku
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Aug 27, 2020

Located in Oita, Japan, House N was designed by Sou Fujimoto for a couple and their dog. The outermost box encases a semi-private yard and outdoor living area, which features a wooden deck, trees and garden space.

The house itself is comprised of three shells of progressive size nested inside one another. The outermost shell covers the entire premises, creating a covered, semi-indoor garden. Second shell encloses a limited space inside the covered outdoor space. Third shell creates a smaller interior space. Residents build their life inside this gradation of domain.

Three nested shells eventually mean infinite nesting because the whole world is made up of infinite nesting. And here are only three of them that are given barely visible shape. I imagined that the city and the house are no different from one another in the essence, but are just different approaches to a continuum of a single subject, or different expressions of the same thing — an undulation of a primordial space where humans dwell.

“A distinct boundary is nowhere to be found, except for a gradual change in the domain. One might say that an ideal architecture is an outdoor space that feels like the indoors and an indoor space that feels like the outdoors. In a nested structure, the inside is invariably the outside, and vice versa. My intention was to make an architecture that is not about space nor about form, but simply about expressing the riches of what are `between` houses and streets.” – Sou Fujimoto
No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
August 27, 2020

Located in Oita, Japan, House N was designed by Sou Fujimoto for a couple and their dog. The outermost box encases a semi-private yard and outdoor living area, which features a wooden deck, trees and garden space.

The house itself is comprised of three shells of progressive size nested inside one another. The outermost shell covers the entire premises, creating a covered, semi-indoor garden. Second shell encloses a limited space inside the covered outdoor space. Third shell creates a smaller interior space. Residents build their life inside this gradation of domain.

Three nested shells eventually mean infinite nesting because the whole world is made up of infinite nesting. And here are only three of them that are given barely visible shape. I imagined that the city and the house are no different from one another in the essence, but are just different approaches to a continuum of a single subject, or different expressions of the same thing — an undulation of a primordial space where humans dwell.

“A distinct boundary is nowhere to be found, except for a gradual change in the domain. One might say that an ideal architecture is an outdoor space that feels like the indoors and an indoor space that feels like the outdoors. In a nested structure, the inside is invariably the outside, and vice versa. My intention was to make an architecture that is not about space nor about form, but simply about expressing the riches of what are `between` houses and streets.” – Sou Fujimoto
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