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Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 23, 2020

At the southwestern tip of Lake Lucerne, at the foot of Pilatus, nestled in a wooded mountain landscape, lies the Obwaldner community Alpnach.

The Küng family, which runs the third-generation local timber construction company of the same name, built their own, innovative residential building there. Consciously, the building seeks to be close to the traditional Obwalden wooden buildings on an architectural as well as a constructive level, but continues to develop these in the sense of a contemporary identity. In this way individual motifs and moods are taken out of context and condensed into a new, independent expression.

The exclusive use of wood determines the architectural expression of the building. Above all, the two arbors, which differ in design and function, shape the "face" of the house. Consequently, even the shading elements of the building were developed as wooden, automated train shops.

Thanks to state-of-the-art processing technology and centuries-old timber construction knowledge, local houses made of local spruce/silver firs created a house made of natural and ecological building materials. If you enter the house from the main entrance, the interior develops as a continuum around a central access core. The option of going different ways between the individual rooms creates the impression of spatial generosity. This is further enhanced on the ground floor in the horizontal by the use of room-high sliding doors and on the upper floor in the vertical through the two-story gallery area.

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Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 23, 2020

At the southwestern tip of Lake Lucerne, at the foot of Pilatus, nestled in a wooded mountain landscape, lies the Obwaldner community Alpnach.

The Küng family, which runs the third-generation local timber construction company of the same name, built their own, innovative residential building there. Consciously, the building seeks to be close to the traditional Obwalden wooden buildings on an architectural as well as a constructive level, but continues to develop these in the sense of a contemporary identity. In this way individual motifs and moods are taken out of context and condensed into a new, independent expression.

The exclusive use of wood determines the architectural expression of the building. Above all, the two arbors, which differ in design and function, shape the "face" of the house. Consequently, even the shading elements of the building were developed as wooden, automated train shops.

Thanks to state-of-the-art processing technology and centuries-old timber construction knowledge, local houses made of local spruce/silver firs created a house made of natural and ecological building materials. If you enter the house from the main entrance, the interior develops as a continuum around a central access core. The option of going different ways between the individual rooms creates the impression of spatial generosity. This is further enhanced on the ground floor in the horizontal by the use of room-high sliding doors and on the upper floor in the vertical through the two-story gallery area.

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