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Architecture
Oct
14
House in Ashiya by Kazunori Fujimoto Architects
Edition
Japan
under the patronage of
Jutaku
under the patronage of
Alexander Zaxarov
Oct 14, 2020

At the foot of Mount Rokko, Japan, Kazunori Fujimoto Architects has built a concrete residence comprising two squares, whose two levels are connected via a unique spiral staircase.

House in Ashiya was built following the refined lines of abstraction of the project with a geometrical precision and clearly minimalist formalization.

A two-story house that intelligently plays three-dimensionally with the geometry of two squares. Abstract geometries that seem to articulate with an elegant staircase in the center of the house, in the words of the architect, "This sculptural geometric form goes beyond the function and becomes the Yorishiro (object in which a spirit is drawn), which it symbolizes the unity of the family in this house."

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
October 14, 2020

At the foot of Mount Rokko, Japan, Kazunori Fujimoto Architects has built a concrete residence comprising two squares, whose two levels are connected via a unique spiral staircase.

House in Ashiya was built following the refined lines of abstraction of the project with a geometrical precision and clearly minimalist formalization.

A two-story house that intelligently plays three-dimensionally with the geometry of two squares. Abstract geometries that seem to articulate with an elegant staircase in the center of the house, in the words of the architect, "This sculptural geometric form goes beyond the function and becomes the Yorishiro (object in which a spirit is drawn), which it symbolizes the unity of the family in this house."

No items found.
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