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Zuzanna Gasior
Aug 18, 2021

Mexican architect René Pérez Gómez has completed Casa Amapa, a pared-back concrete house nestled in the Primavera forest near Guadalajara in Mexico.

"We design a stereotomic structure that emerges from Earth with free and naked materiality that faces the architecture, stripped, with its surroundings. Generating a dialogue that with time will erase the lines that today separate them, wanting to become impossible to define where the architecture ends and starts the forest" explain the architects.

Informed by "stereotomic" architecture – meaning spaces formed by cutting and subtracting rather than adding – the board-marked concrete walls of the home are treated as a found object. Guadalajara-based Pérez Gómez said the effect is intended to make it look as though the walls "emerged from the Earth". Open staircases connect these terraces to the living level, with a larger wing to the east housing a living, kitchen and dining area and en-suite main bedroom.

A smaller wing to the west contains two smaller en-suite bedrooms. Space for parking has been tucked away behind the concrete walls, and a simple driveway incorporating a cluster of existing trees leads out into the forest.

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Zuzanna Gasior
Aug 18, 2021

Mexican architect René Pérez Gómez has completed Casa Amapa, a pared-back concrete house nestled in the Primavera forest near Guadalajara in Mexico.

"We design a stereotomic structure that emerges from Earth with free and naked materiality that faces the architecture, stripped, with its surroundings. Generating a dialogue that with time will erase the lines that today separate them, wanting to become impossible to define where the architecture ends and starts the forest" explain the architects.

Informed by "stereotomic" architecture – meaning spaces formed by cutting and subtracting rather than adding – the board-marked concrete walls of the home are treated as a found object. Guadalajara-based Pérez Gómez said the effect is intended to make it look as though the walls "emerged from the Earth". Open staircases connect these terraces to the living level, with a larger wing to the east housing a living, kitchen and dining area and en-suite main bedroom.

A smaller wing to the west contains two smaller en-suite bedrooms. Space for parking has been tucked away behind the concrete walls, and a simple driveway incorporating a cluster of existing trees leads out into the forest.

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