Thisispaper Community
Join today.
Enter your email address to receive the latest news on emerging art, design, lifestyle and tech from Thisispaper, delivered straight to your inbox.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Alexander Zaxarov
Nov 6, 2020

A structure of steel pontoons allows this wooden cabin by MOS Architects to float on the surface of Lake Huron.

The Floating House is part of a master plan including five proposed guest houses based on the repetition of a generic vernacular house. Located on a remote island in Lake Huron with a harsh seasonal climate, an on-site construction process would have been difficult, so the 2,200-square-foot house was built on a floating steel pontoon structure at the contractor’s lakeside workshop and then towed and anchored to the final site for the installation of finishes. The front of the house faces the water. There is a loose symmetry in the plan. The entrance opens onto a landscaped path that passes through the building and down the stairs, wrapped behind a screen of cedar siding. This path connects the two sides of the

The house is clad in a cedar plank rainscreen that visually unifies walls and roof. The spacing of the planks varies around openings to admit light and air. The rainscreen provides air movement between interior and exterior, dissipating heat gain and reducing wind load. Anchored to the granite lakebed, the house moves with the changing water level. The architecture floats; it is an abstraction of the vernacular house, displaced onto the lake.

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
November 6, 2020

A structure of steel pontoons allows this wooden cabin by MOS Architects to float on the surface of Lake Huron.

The Floating House is part of a master plan including five proposed guest houses based on the repetition of a generic vernacular house. Located on a remote island in Lake Huron with a harsh seasonal climate, an on-site construction process would have been difficult, so the 2,200-square-foot house was built on a floating steel pontoon structure at the contractor’s lakeside workshop and then towed and anchored to the final site for the installation of finishes. The front of the house faces the water. There is a loose symmetry in the plan. The entrance opens onto a landscaped path that passes through the building and down the stairs, wrapped behind a screen of cedar siding. This path connects the two sides of the

The house is clad in a cedar plank rainscreen that visually unifies walls and roof. The spacing of the planks varies around openings to admit light and air. The rainscreen provides air movement between interior and exterior, dissipating heat gain and reducing wind load. Anchored to the granite lakebed, the house moves with the changing water level. The architecture floats; it is an abstraction of the vernacular house, displaced onto the lake.

Architecture
section is proudly under the patronage of:
John Pawson

Independent publications like Thisispaper rely on support by readers and companies to be sustainable.

Current patron of Architecture Section:

If you are ready to book a slot, please use the following link:
Become a Patron

Visit Thisispaper Shop
IntroducingEditions
Discover the most inspiring stories, places and people through carefully-curated editions you'll love.
Explore all EditionsExplore channels