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Hitoshi Arato
May 21, 2021

Ebisu No Ie is a minimal japanese house located in Tokyo, Japan, designed by Tetsuo Yamaji Architects.

This Tokyo house is divided into 5 modules of 1.7 x 2.2 metres through a network of steel beams and pillars. The lattice structure thus composed is left exposed and buffered by glass on the short sides and by wooden panels on the long sides. The layout of the shelves – trapezoidal sheet metal modules finished with resin cement – based on this hollow parallelepiped was defined according to customer requirements.

The very conformation of the lot - with different planking levels on the two side glass panes - and the interlocking of split horizontal planes with vertical connections create spatial compressions and decompressions within the volume and in relation to the surrounding urban landscape, creating a residential area where you can live, work and meet, according to the changing needs of a Japanese family over time.

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Hitoshi Arato
May 21, 2021

Ebisu No Ie is a minimal japanese house located in Tokyo, Japan, designed by Tetsuo Yamaji Architects.

This Tokyo house is divided into 5 modules of 1.7 x 2.2 metres through a network of steel beams and pillars. The lattice structure thus composed is left exposed and buffered by glass on the short sides and by wooden panels on the long sides. The layout of the shelves – trapezoidal sheet metal modules finished with resin cement – based on this hollow parallelepiped was defined according to customer requirements.

The very conformation of the lot - with different planking levels on the two side glass panes - and the interlocking of split horizontal planes with vertical connections create spatial compressions and decompressions within the volume and in relation to the surrounding urban landscape, creating a residential area where you can live, work and meet, according to the changing needs of a Japanese family over time.

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