Thisispaper Community
Join today.
Enter your email address to receive the latest news on emerging art, design, lifestyle and tech from Thisispaper, delivered straight to your inbox.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Design
Aug
19
Claudio Chair by Arquitectura-G
Alexander Zaxarov
Aug 19, 2020

The formal elements of the Claudio Chair designed by ARQUITECTURA-G are derived from the rhythmic architectural framework of an arcade and the repetition of arches.

The chair brings an architectural look to domestic scale. A reinterpretation of the classic semi-circular arch in a structure made out of thin steel planes. The lower part of the legs is rounded so each one only leans in a single point. Then, the legs make up an L-shaped cross-section which transforms into arches in each plane, making the joints under the seat stiff. To form the back, the rear arch grows without touching the seat – a horizontal plane that reinforces the categorically geometrical character of the piece - until it reaches the proper height.

The trapezoidal form of the seat breaks the formal purity of the whole, giving in exchange a fake illusion of vanishing point, in the way of forced perspectives of the renaissance and the paintings of G. de Chirico.

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
August 19, 2020

The formal elements of the Claudio Chair designed by ARQUITECTURA-G are derived from the rhythmic architectural framework of an arcade and the repetition of arches.

The chair brings an architectural look to domestic scale. A reinterpretation of the classic semi-circular arch in a structure made out of thin steel planes. The lower part of the legs is rounded so each one only leans in a single point. Then, the legs make up an L-shaped cross-section which transforms into arches in each plane, making the joints under the seat stiff. To form the back, the rear arch grows without touching the seat – a horizontal plane that reinforces the categorically geometrical character of the piece - until it reaches the proper height.

The trapezoidal form of the seat breaks the formal purity of the whole, giving in exchange a fake illusion of vanishing point, in the way of forced perspectives of the renaissance and the paintings of G. de Chirico.

section is proudly under the patronage of:
IntroducingEditions
Discover the most inspiring stories, places and people through carefully-curated editions you'll love.
Explore all EditionsExplore channels
Visit Thisispaper Shop
No items found.
No items found.