Join Early Access
Be the first to know about our new curated channels and new platform functionalities updates.

Enter your email address to be added to the list. We'll email you very soon.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Become a Member
Join Free
Log in to your account
Log in
By creating an account, you agree Term & Conditions and accept our Policy.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Don't have an account? Register now.
Bumpers Oast by ACME
Alexander Zaxarov
Jan 20, 2020

Acme brings sensitivity and creativity to the challenge of building a contemporary house in a rural setting.

Oast houses can be found all over the Kent countryside and today many of them are converted into homes. They would be built with pointed towers, so that hops harvested from the surrounding fields could be hung up to dry before being sent off to a brewery.

"It was an agricultural typology from the 15th century up to the 19th century," — ACME director Friedrich Ludewig.

In order to make the house suitable for modern family life, ACME had to break some of the usual rules of oast house construction. Typically the towers would be built in a cluster, without any gaps in between. Ludewig's team realised they needed to introduce gaps, to integrate the living spaces with the surrounding garden.

No items found.
No items found.
Alexander Zaxarov
January 20, 2020

Acme brings sensitivity and creativity to the challenge of building a contemporary house in a rural setting.

Oast houses can be found all over the Kent countryside and today many of them are converted into homes. They would be built with pointed towers, so that hops harvested from the surrounding fields could be hung up to dry before being sent off to a brewery.

"It was an agricultural typology from the 15th century up to the 19th century," — ACME director Friedrich Ludewig.

In order to make the house suitable for modern family life, ACME had to break some of the usual rules of oast house construction. Typically the towers would be built in a cluster, without any gaps in between. Ludewig's team realised they needed to introduce gaps, to integrate the living spaces with the surrounding garden.

Architecture
section is proudly under the patronage of:
John Pawson

Independent publications like Thisispaper rely on support by readers and companies to be sustainable.

Current patron of Architecture Section:

If you are ready to book a slot, please use the following link:
Become a Patron

Introducing Channels
Feed your curiosity and make better sense of the world through carefully-curated channels that matter to you.
Discover the most inspiring stories, people and ideas through channels you love.
Get Early AccessExplore channels
Daily human-curation.
Weekly roundups.

Worlds-class sources.

Meaningful ideas.
No ads, no personal data.
Coronavirus
DwellWell
climax logo thisispaper
DwellWell
Lifespan
>nocode<
+ 3 more
Thisispaper Shop
Spring Sale
30-50% off
Visit Shop