Thisispaper Community
Join today.
Enter your email address to receive the latest news on emerging art, design, lifestyle and tech from Thisispaper, delivered straight to your inbox.
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Instant access to new channels
The top stories curated daily
Weekly roundups of what's important
Weekly roundups of what's important
Original features and deep dives
Exclusive community features
Edition
Art Spaces
under the patronage of
Belgium
under the patronage of
Zuzanna Gasior
Nov 21, 2021

Jon Lott (principal of Para Project), completes the Brugge Diptych - a temporary pavilion for the 2021 Brugge Triennale, in Belgium.

The Diptych serves as an event space for the Triennale’s programming, addressing issues in urban trauma, and is one of several international commissions open within the city through late Fall.

Docked within Brugge’s peripheral and residential waterways, and roughly the same size as its neighbors, the wood-framed pavilion floats on 15 pontoons, avoiding any direct contact with the protected UNESCO Heritage city.

The visitor floats mid-block, abutting an abandoned 15thc. canal house, thereby dividing the block in two. Its proximity with the canal house is consequential in several ways. Through estrangements of orientation, material, scale, and posture, the pavilion attempts to recognize something of itself in its new neighbor. It seems both have their trauma to work through. Afterall, architecture is felt before it is understood.

The project is the third in a serial study of urban “strangers,” including Lott’s Storefront for Storefront (2016) and the Roche/Dinkeloo Double, at the Fine Arts Centers, Amherst (2018). Each embrace the familiar construction technique of “common framing” in partnership with their respective institutional urban concerns.

Brugge Triennale brings contemporary art and architecture to the historic core of the city of Bruges every three years in a unique setting as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Since 2015, it has been building on a series of triennials that were put together in 1968, 1971 and 1974 around visual art, and which have now become part of the public domain. Every three years, a selection of (inter)national artists and architects are invited by the artistic team to propose new temporary interventions around a theme that is based on the city.

No items found.
No items found.
Zuzanna Gasior
Nov 21, 2021

Jon Lott (principal of Para Project), completes the Brugge Diptych - a temporary pavilion for the 2021 Brugge Triennale, in Belgium.

The Diptych serves as an event space for the Triennale’s programming, addressing issues in urban trauma, and is one of several international commissions open within the city through late Fall.

Docked within Brugge’s peripheral and residential waterways, and roughly the same size as its neighbors, the wood-framed pavilion floats on 15 pontoons, avoiding any direct contact with the protected UNESCO Heritage city.

The visitor floats mid-block, abutting an abandoned 15thc. canal house, thereby dividing the block in two. Its proximity with the canal house is consequential in several ways. Through estrangements of orientation, material, scale, and posture, the pavilion attempts to recognize something of itself in its new neighbor. It seems both have their trauma to work through. Afterall, architecture is felt before it is understood.

The project is the third in a serial study of urban “strangers,” including Lott’s Storefront for Storefront (2016) and the Roche/Dinkeloo Double, at the Fine Arts Centers, Amherst (2018). Each embrace the familiar construction technique of “common framing” in partnership with their respective institutional urban concerns.

Brugge Triennale brings contemporary art and architecture to the historic core of the city of Bruges every three years in a unique setting as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Since 2015, it has been building on a series of triennials that were put together in 1968, 1971 and 1974 around visual art, and which have now become part of the public domain. Every three years, a selection of (inter)national artists and architects are invited by the artistic team to propose new temporary interventions around a theme that is based on the city.

Architecture
section is proudly under the patronage of:
John Pawson

Independent publications like Thisispaper rely on support by readers and companies to be sustainable.

Current patron of Architecture Section:

If you are ready to book a slot, please use the following link:
Become a Patron

section is proudly under the patronage of:
Introducing OS
An intimate space which helps creative minds thrive.
Discover. Share. Embrace.
Visit New Thisispaper Shop
ThisispaperOSGuides
Discover the most inspiring places and stories through carefully-curated guides and editions you'll love.
Explore all GuidesExplore channels