March 29, 2019
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Peter Opsvik
The Movement
Peter Opsvik

In the history of Norwegian design, the story of Peter Opsvik’s young son Tor, who couldn’t reach the top of the table from his chair, is well-known. In response Opsvik created the Tripp Trapp, a chair with two adjustable surfaces that allows the child to grow with the chair and, as Opsvik says, “sit at the grown-up’s table.” Since its inception, the Tripp Trapp has sold over 9 million copies, and is now considered a design classic that has become a part of MoMA’s permanent collection.

But the chair is only a small part in a larger quest Opsvik has taken into the field of sitting. Born in 1939, he’s closing in on 80 years, but he remains dedicated to what he believes should be the non-static activity of sitting.

The Chair


In 2008 Opsvik published the book Rethinking Sitting, where he declared his thoughts on the subject of the title. “They’re not studies, just observations and reflections,” he says, sitting in his studio located in the center of Oslo.
   After graduating from the Oslo National Academy of the Arts in 1964, Opsvik went on to work for the radio manufacturer Tandberg, presently recognized as a contributing force to Norwegian industrialdesign. In the 1970s he started freelancing under his own name and today he leads a team of designers.
   “When I first started designing chairs, professors and ergonomists knew exactly how you should sit — which angles were best and which were the most important. My contribution was that I said they were all right,” he tells me. “I made seating furniture that inspired to alternate between these positions. And then you have your conclusion, which will make for a good headline: The best seating position is, after a while, always the next.”
   He starts demonstrating: “If you’re at the movies and you sit down, 20 minutes pass and you want to do this, and this, and this,” he explains as he moves his legs and body, shifting as if he’s in an actual theatre. “And that is my contribution. If you just look in this [points at his book], there are all kindsof seating positions.”
   Opsvik is reluctant to be interviewed; he’d much prefer that I quote from his book instead. “Everything you want to ask, you’ll find the answer in here,” he assures me.
   “I suggest that you just use this, and all the photos are here—everything.”
   He leafs through the book that inhabits his thoughts from the past 50 years. In one picture he is a young student, carving a chair from a block of ice. Other pages reveal unrealized designs, such as the shin support for hairdressers in the 80s, which allowed them to go into a semi-kneeling position while standing up. There are also sketches and observations in research for the Tripp Trapp, the Capisco office chair (1984) and the Garden chair (1985), all of which are some of his most known and awarded designs.
    Opsvik prefers not to be interviewed, or have his objects photographed, without
being in total control. He has been through these situations many times, telling journalists the story of the Tripp Trapp chair, or how he sees his work as “new functionalist.” “If you have to call it anything, call it new functionalism,” he says when I ask how he sees himself in the narrative of the so-called Scandinavian modernism. “If you look around, everything you see is on the outer limits of what we call Scandinavian design,” he declares matter-of-factly.

Opsvik prefers not to be interviewed, or have his objects photographed, without
being in total control. He has been through these situations many times, telling journalists the story of the Tripp Trapp chair, or how he sees his work as “new functionalist.” “If you have to call it anything, call it new functionalism,” he says when I ask how he sees himself in the narrative of the so-called Scandinavian modernism. “If you look around, everything you see is on the outer limits of what we call Scandinavian design,” he declares matter-of-factly.

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